Tag Archives: analog street photography

Photography Book: Andre Kertesz Paris Autumn 1963

I have began my collection of photography books and thought it would be nice to write about the things which I have observed and learned.

I will start with Andre Kertesz, Paris 1963.  I purchased the book after a recommendation from Bristreet to have a look at for Kertesz high POV and superb shadow work.

The book gives a bio on his journey as a photographer. He was born in Hungary, but moved to Paris to pursue his dream as a photographer and became quite successful. A move to New York would prove a challenge as he did not like the constraints of commission work thus quitting after sometime.

When he finally returned to Paris in October of 1963, he went photo crazy. In 2.5 months he shot 1500 negatives and about 300 colour slides!! That is like digital gunfire albeit expensive.

I can understand his eagerness, imagine how liberated he would have been, like a bird free of his cage, able to finally produce things he wanted.

The photographs are a selection of his black and white work taken during the 2.5 months. I immediately notice his keen eye on geometry and lines. Interestingly we get to see his process as a photographer. The images presented have a thread as we get to see his journey, finding different angles, subjects and pov to shoot whilst on the same place. Landmarks repeat which indicates his exploration of the area he is photographing in. He particularly uses trees as a foreground element to frame his subjects as can be seen on the front cover of the book.

I find life can be felt in his images. Those everyday moments but crafted with his curious eye. Something we all do as photographers, it is almost reassuring. I find them quite nostalgic and have very much enjoyed the book.  I think I might devote an entire roll of film with the aim of trying to shoot in the manner of Kertesz. If anyone is interested you are more than welcome to join me 🙂

 

 

 

Advertisements

Curiosity

I got into film photography out of curiosity. To see the grain, its limits, and to slow down the pace of my digital machine gun fire.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

I regret not doing photography as a subject in high school as it taught the basics of film as well as developing. But I probably wouldn’t have learn much as it may not have been in my interest. I drew alot, did art in high school and afterwards chose architecture as a profession under the guidance of my art teacher. Intuitively I put the two things together, I liked to draw, architecture is about drawings and making so it must be a perfect fit. Fast forward to where I am now, and it could not be further from the truth. The creation is there, but the creativity not so much unless you work for a “starchitect”.

untitled-12

In essence it is an office job.  Dress shirts, pants and shoes minus the suit jacket. One stares at a computer screen for 8 hours drawing lines, emailing and so forth. Sometimes there are site visits and check ups but not often.

Thankfully I found photography as a form of creative release. Jumped into analog after 1 year of digital and have a love hate relationship with it.

I had to relearn patience. I dislike the cost aspect of it but why save money on things I do not want to do. I am frustrated on the average quality of the images when compared to the masters but that only keeps me going.

For the craft and understanding that we must put in time, as did the pioneers of the medium.

 

Saturated

I now have a number of rolls that have been developed and not seeing them for such a long time makes it easier to be objective about the image. The result is that I like very little of them from the roll.

I have been thinking for awhile about culling the amount of photos I have shared on the web, and perhaps posting one or two in a month from then on. Image sharing feels like a race for me these days.  Shooting something, then posting. The value of the image lost in a sea of photographs. Bombarded by so much quantity, quality gets affected.

Printing is something I have also been thinking about doing lately. Selecting a few images that I consider to be acceptable and physically interacting with it. A way to slow down the pace. Halting it together. Time use to stop when I shot. Now it races.  I have lost control and need to regain sanity and start enjoying photography once again. To start shooting for me, to say something from the inside rather than from those I idolize or creating an image for others. I would like to thank my dear friend Vasillis for the clarity and dialogue on these issues.

untitled-7

 

 

Roll 4: Ilford HP5

Roll 4: Ilford HP5

Truly enjoyed the discrete size of the Canonet. Very much able to capture moments with ease.

 

Dawg

This dog was enjoying the street life. He has got the hat to prove he is down with the rest of us.

Smoko

 

Funnily enough, I do not remember taking this photograph at all. Weird. Has that ever happend to any of you guys/girls shooting?